Monday, April 2, 2012

Harvest Monday - April 2, 2012

 
First cutting of garlic chives (4.30 lbs)
Spring garlic chive is very mild and sweet tasting, most of the harvest will be made into pesto (similar to garlic scape pesto), some will go into stir fry, dumplings, stuffed breads, and savory pancakes.


 Garlic chives before haircut.


Sugar snap peas in half barrel, last year I direct sowed and lost all pea seedlings to birds.
This time I started seeds indoor and grow the seedlings to 2-3 inches tall before transplanting
them to its permanent location, the birds leave them alone, yay!


Broccoli rabe, red choysum, dwarf bok choy, red leaf lettuce.
These babies can use some N.


Red baby beets 


These are spring plant Shandong garlic, I didn't get around to plant them last fall,
maybe I'll luck out and get some bulbs, maybe not.


First success in winter sown sweet pea flowers, I've been trying for years to start the seeds but no luck, last winter I finally try the popular "winter sown" method, threw some seeds into a pot covered with soil and wait, voila!  It worked.   

Drop by Daphne's Dandelions host of Harvest Monday to see more harvests from around the globe.


 


16 comments:

Daphne said...

Those garlic chives look so pretty. I've been harvesting my regular chives, but not my garlic ones yet. I want to divide them this year so I'll wait to eat them until later.

Beep pocock said...

Nice chives. Your beetroot is looking fine - mine are just coming up.

Mary Hysong said...

Your garden is looking awesome! I love your garlic chives; I've never seen any so big! I started a few clumps from seed this year so I think it will be awhile before they are very big.

Nartaya said...

Your garlic chives are so beautiful!

Dave said...

I never thought about making pesto with garlic chives. I have a lot of them now too, so I will give that a try.

Mac said...

Daphne,
Yeah, it takes about 2 years to get a good harvest, after that they just need thinning once in a while.


Beep pocock,
Thanks and welcome, those baby beets have been growing for a while and they are just picking up speed lately.


Mary,
Yup, they take 2 years to get establish, after that is no work at all, they grow like weeds.


Nartaya,
Thanks.


Dave,
Do give the pesto a try, you might like it.

Norma Chang said...

That's an awful lot of garlic chives. Mine is just coming in. You have a lot growing already.

kitsapFG said...

I just have regular chives but am now thinking I need to grow some garlic chives too! Always something new and interesting to grow.

Your young pea seeds look great. Glad you found a way to thwart the hungry birds.

Bee Girl said...

Everything looks so happy and healthy! Wonderful!

~Holly~ said...

Beautiful garlic chives. Seeing your garden coming along makes me want to start planting! I'm so behind this year!

Liz - Suburban Tomato said...

I like the idea of garlic chives pesto - what else do you put in it?

Mac said...

kitsapFG, Bee Girl,
Thanks, unfortunately winter revisits our area last night, still pouring snow as I write, I think the peas and greens are gone.


Holly,
Thanks, long time no see welcome back.


Liz,
I do the basic pesto just oil and salt so that I can use it either in western or Asian cooking, I add more spices or other ingredients to the pesto as I cook, depending on the menu.

pooks said...

You've intrigued me with your garlic chives. I planted mine years ago--many years--and have never done anything but let them grow and bloom. I clipped some to use in salad last week. Now I'm wondering if I should harvest them all and let them start over growing again....

They're really huge and tall. I just cut off the top six or eight inches for my salad.

My harvest Monday: http://planetpooks.com/?p=4468

Mac said...

pooks,
Spring is a good time to cut the chives all the way back to ground level and let them regrow.
You'll get more tender leaves that way, but if you're using the chives as decorative plants maybe just cut off a small clump for eating and leave the rest alone.

pooks said...

Since I now see that they can be snipped and frozen to use in recipes later, as well as cooked fresh, I may go ahead and cut them back and let them grow again to be more fresh and tender than they are now. I never would have thought of that if I hadn't seen your garlic chive harvest. I just thought of them as something you might snip from occasionally! Thanks for the info and inspiration.

Mac said...

You're welcome, thanks for dropping by.