Thursday, November 10, 2011

Butternut Squash Flour

There are seventeen butternut squashes steering at me in the storage room and I'm itching to experiment with something new.  Lately some of my friends are using winter squash flour to bake delicious chiffon cakes and breads, they purchased organic squash flour from an oversea specialty farmer, I'm not aware of any source for such product here in the states.  Generally I'm not a sweets person, most bakery items don't appeal to me, but those cakes and breads made with squash flour got my attention, I just have to grind my own flour and try to bake with it.


It's pretty easy to make the flour:  shred the squash, dehydrate, and then grind.
Butternut squash flour is high in sugar content, it will cake up and becomes lumpy over time, it's best to use the flour within 6 months or keep in freezer.


Dehydrated squash ground into flour for use in baking.
I use a VitaMix blender (dry grain blade) to do the job.
Two small squash yielded 6 oz (~180g) of flour, I'll make more if my cake turns out as expected.


Dehydrated squash.
The dehydrator was set at 145F for overnight drying.


Four trays for two small butternut squashes.


Drop by Robin's Thursday's Kitchen Cupboard to see more preserving ideas and yummy recipes.



21 comments:

Robin said...

What a great post! I have never heard of Butternut Squash Flour. You so need to post a recipe!

Emily said...

I can't wait to hear how the cake turns out!

Daphne said...

That sounds delicious. I make pumpkin cake, but don't use squash flour for it.

becky3086 said...

Wonderful! Thanks.

Mac said...

Robin, Emily, Daphne, becky2086,
Thanks.
I haven't baked a cake in years, when I figure out how to adapt a regular sponge cake recipe for pumpkin cake. I'll post a photo of the cake and the trial recipe.

kitsapFG said...

This is very intrigueing! The flour looks beautiful and I can just imagine what a soft "cake flour" texture it must provide along with the sweetness of the squash itself. Please do a follow up on this and let us know how your cooking results turn out.

Michelle said...

Very interesting indeed. I do hope your cake comes out great and that you share a photo and recipe with us. I wonder how the flour would be in something like waffles or pancakes?

Mac said...

kitsapFG,
I'll definitely do a follow up later and let everyone knows how the "cake" turns out.


michelle,
Good suggestion, I haven't thought of using the flour for pancakes and waffles, I should go ahead and make more flour to play with different ideas.

Liz said...

What a fascinating idea, I'm kind of imagining it to have a texture like chickpea flour???

Mac said...

Liz,
You might be correct about the texture, I've never used chickpea flour before so I couldn't tell the difference between the two.

farfly775 said...

That is very intrigueing! I can imagine how delicate the cakes would be. I wonder if the grating, dehydrating, and grinding would work for other veggie possibilities like sweet potato noodles?

foodgardenkitchen said...

Wow, I would have never thought about making flour out of a winter squash. I'll be interested to see the follow up!

Mac said...

foodgardenkitchen,
I made a chiffon cake with the squash flour, stay tuned for the post on Thursday.


farfly775,
The same method would work for all veggies if you want the flour to be "whole flour", otherwise there are techniques to remove unwanted properties in the flour to make into another product.
I believe the sugar in sweet potato flour/noodles had been removed to keep the product "stable" and longer shelflife.

Randy Larson said...

That's an excellent use of squash. I've never thought of squash flour, but I'm not very intrigued. I've been playing with squash-leather with good success. Here's another great thing to try.

Mac said...

Randy,
Good idea, I haven't thought of squash-leather. I have to give it a go someday.

Randy Larson said...

I'm 'now' very intrigued, not 'not' :)

b said...

How did the flour turn out? I'm going to try it for my wife. She has dietary issues and can't eat any grains. Thanks.

Mac said...

b,
The flour turned out nice, but you have to sift out the bigger pieces that didn't get pulverized.

b said...

I made the flour yesterday and used it as a breading for pork chops. My wife can not do grains. I pan fried the chops and put mariana over them with muenster cheese in a casserole dish and baked them. She said they were awesome!!!!

Mac said...

b,
Yum~ your pork chops sound delicious, glad the squash flour worked out for you.

Ven Karri said...

I want to try this on acorn squash.