Monday, October 31, 2011

Harvest Monday - October 31, 2011

These ginger roots are rather small compare to last year's harvest.
I made the mistake of leaving them in a shady corner and forgot to fertilize them.


Celtuce grows well in our region, I've been able to harvest both spring and fall crops this year.


White daikon, Asian red radish, carrots, and Beauty Heart radish.

I picked the last watermelon few days ago, harvested all of the purple beans, cherry tomatoes and eggplants.  There are flowers buds on the sugar snap peas, I'm not sure we get to eat any because night temp is dipping to freezing point and first hard freeze is in the horizon.  We just came back from vacation and I'm leaving again for another trip in couple days, the veggie garden is waiting to be cleaned up >__<"


Drop by Daphne's Dandelions host of Harvest Monday to see more garden harvests around the globe.




18 comments:

  1. Harvesting young ginger roots and celtuce at this time of year how wonderful!!!!! What zone are you in?

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  2. Norma,
    Thanks for visiting, I'm in Zone 7a, sometimes more like a Zone 6.

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  3. I'm still waiting (impatiently) for my ginger to come up. I'm desperately hoping it will! I grew it for the first time last year and have decided to feed it at lot more this year. It does seems to like a bit of food doesn't it. I'm not familiar with celtuce at all. How do you use it?

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  4. Liz,
    Ginger seems to take a loooooong time to push through the soil and growing roots that's why I put them out of the way and conveniently forget to tend to its needs, arhhhhhhh.

    Celtuce stem is commonly stir fry, use raw in salad, or pickle. The leaves are not salad quality, it's a bit coarse, some people stir fry the leaves. I'll do a post on using celtuce someday (hope I remember). I made a salad using celtuce back in June, scroll down to the last picture here:
    http://www.highdesertgarden.com/2011/06/celtuce.html

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  5. Mac,
    You have a long growing season, how wonderful! I am waiting for the freak October snow to melt so I get to my garden and assess the damage.

    Liz,
    Where did you get your ginger for planting? If it was from the grocery store, it may or may not grow at all as it may be treated with a growth retardant. Try getting a piece from the health food store.

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  6. Beautiful harvests as always. I have always wanted to grow ginger root. I think that I would have to grow mine in a large pot since we live in zone 6b

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  7. Norma,
    The recent snow storm caused lots of damage, hope your garden is ok'd.


    Robin,
    I grow my ginger in large pots, I left one clump in each pot to see if they will come up next spring.

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  8. wow, nice ginger. What do you do with that much ginger? I barely even use one root in a year! Maybe I need to broaden my cooking skills! How do you start it? Kind of like a potato?

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  9. Shawn Ann,
    Young ginger root is very mild, tender, and tasty, I like to stir fry it with beef (a popular Chinese dish).
    The roots can be pickled, candied, make into jelly ect.
    Perhaps you're familiar with this sushi "gari" (pickled ginger):
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gari_%28ginger%29
    The pink color is from food coloring.

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  10. Your harvest is so beautiful! You didn't even mention the garlic chives the celtuce is resting on. I am having trouble getting mine to bulk up. Have a wonderful trip!

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  11. Nartaya,
    Thanks.
    The garlic chive needs to be divided soon, want some root division? If you're growing from seeds it takes 2 years to establish its root system, once you get a clump going it doesn't die easily, good luck with yours.

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  12. I have been meaning to start a large container with some ginger but have never gotten around to it. Did you get your starts from a nursery or catalog source, or did you just start some from a grocery store ginger purchase?

    Beautiful harvest as always Mac and safe travels.

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  13. kitsapFG, Shawn Ann,
    The starts were bought from local grocery store, I chose those with "eyes" ready to sprout roots and left them on the kitchen counter until they sprouted then transplant to a large container.

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  14. Thanks Mac for the answer to my question. I need to remember to pick some out this spring and grow some in a pot.

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  15. Wow! I love the photo of your ginger. I tried growing supermarket ginger in a pot this year and did get some green shoots, but I poked around the soil and discovered that the root itself didn't seem to grow much. I brought the pot inside for the winter and will try to keep it growing next year.

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  16. GrafixMuse,
    Thanks, ginger takes a loooooooong time to grow roots, I left some in a pot and see if they would overwinter for me, right now our night temp has dipped into low 20s they look ok for now, I might have to move it to the shed or garage later.

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  17. We're talking about growing some ginger next year. Several of the local farmers grew it this year and it smelled great at the market. Good to read that getting "seed ginger" from the grocery store might work!

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  18. foodgarden,
    Ginger would grow year round in your garden, with all the humidity and heat I bet the roots grows much faster and bigger than desert environment, good luck with your ginger, it's pretty easy to grow.

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